Announcing Our Photo Contest Winners!

The caliber of photos we received in this year’s “California Through My Eyes” contest was pretty amazing. Our judges had no small task in trying to select our winner and runners-up, all of whom received a cash prize. In addition, the judges helped select about 60 photos to be named for honorable mention. The final results (showcased below) are pretty incredible and illustrate the diversity and wonder of the state of California! You can also see all of these photos on display at the State Capitol building, starting June 20. They’ll be located on the third floor of the annex.

Hundreds of student photographers participated from 54 high school around the state, submitting not only their photo but an essay describing how their photo represents California. We want to thank the schools, districts and legislative offices that helped spread the word about the contest, which we hope allows students to exercise their creativity while thinking critically about what California means to them.

GRAND PRIZE WINNER ($150)

Puente

EMELY PUENTE, Bellflower High School

Emely was selected as the grand prize winner for her photo, Lost in Thought, a portrait of her grandfather sitting at his home. As she notes, her grandparents “made themselves a part of California when they arrived in the early 70’s. They had to support their 8 children together so they made a living as strawberry pickers, working as a mechanic and being a housemaid…My generation will never understand what it is like to struggle – we get things handed down to us instead of earning it. This is California through my eyes.”

RUNNERS – UP ($100), in alphabetical order  Continue reading

Photo Contest Highlights

Every year, LegiSchool hosts our California Through My Eyes Photo contest, where we ask students to step behind the lens and capture an image that represents California. One grand prize winner  and four runners-up receive cash prizes. All winning photos and honorable mention entries are displayed at the Capitol during the summer.

Our contest is now open, so we decided to use this occasion and highlight some of the amazing photos we have received over the last few years: Continue reading

Essay Winners at the Capitol

On March 2nd, our essay winners from around the state gathered together in Sacramento to meet with lawmakers and talk to them about their ideas regarding youth political participation.

To begin the day, students met with Assemlymember Talamantes Eggman, chair of the Assembly Select Committee on Civic Engagement. She talked with them about the importance of getting involved in your community, using examples from her past to illustrate her point. Students had the chance to ask her a lot of great questions about her work, her life, and her career. She had some amazing words of wisdom and advice that she passed on to the winners.

TalamatesEggman

StudentsRegisteringNext, Assemblymember Gonzalez spoke with students about her efforts to increase political participation among youth – including a bill she is authoring to lower the voting age for some elections to 16. In addition, Continue reading

And the winners are…

In 2014, LegiSchool introduced an editorial cartoon contest into our portfolio of civic education opportunities, and the response we received was overwhelmingly positive. So, we’ve made the contest an annual affair!

Each year, we partner with KQED’s The Lowdown to invite high school students to express their opinions on current issues by creating an original editorial cartoon. The purpose of the contest is to incite critical thinking on contemporary issues by young people in our state. Winning entries receive cash prizes and are published on the KQED website.

Students were allowed to submit a cartoon based on any issue that is relevant to California this year. As you can see from the results, Continue reading

Political Participation by Youth – Part 5

Photo Credit: Colin McPherson, from the Independent article “Election 2015: How to encourage young people to vote

We are now wrapping up our series on political participation by youth. With each post, we’ve revealed 2 of our contest winners’ thoughts on this very important topic (to see the full series and all our winners, click here).

Let’s end the series where we began: highlighting the decisive power young people can have in an election. The Millenials now outnumber the Baby Boomers, which makes them the largest living generation. If they show up at the polls in 2016 as often as Baby Boomers do, they will have an enormous impact on the election.

Where will they have the most impact?  Continue reading